February82014
hehasawifeyouknow:

Go on guess, I’ll give you a date, approx 320 BCE and from Western Greece.
Still no idea? Well, it’s a baby’s feeding bottle, albeit one which might put the poor child of fish forever. Cheers to SarahEBond (find her on twitter!) for this.

hehasawifeyouknow:

Go on guess, I’ll give you a date, approx 320 BCE and from Western Greece.

Still no idea? Well, it’s a baby’s feeding bottle, albeit one which might put the poor child of fish forever. Cheers to SarahEBond (find her on twitter!) for this.

February42014
proteus7:

1st century Hellenic temple near Garni, Armenia built by Tiridates I

proteus7:

1st century Hellenic temple near Garni, Armenia built by Tiridates I

(via fuckingromans)

January222014
archaicwonder:

Hellenistic gold olive wreath diadem Circa 3rd Century BC
The diadem composed of sheet gold over a tubular core, decorated with several long spear-shaped leaves with impressed veins and delicate hollow gold fruits, all attached to the core with twisted gold wire, a composition of four larger leaves and four berries at the centre.

archaicwonder:

Hellenistic gold olive wreath diadem Circa 3rd Century BC


The diadem composed of sheet gold over a tubular core, decorated with several long spear-shaped leaves with impressed veins and delicate hollow gold fruits, all attached to the core with twisted gold wire, a composition of four larger leaves and four berries at the centre.

(via wooden-folks)

December92013
The above image is a 16th century Islamic painting of Alexander the Great exploring the Mediterranean in an early form of diving bell.
Diving bells are an apparatus used to allow divers to reach great depths maintaining a supply of oxygen inside the bell. Although not widely used or documented until the 16th century, Aristotle is credited with the first description of a diving bell in the 4th century BC.
"…they enable the divers to respire equally well by letting down a cauldron, for this does not fill with water, but retains the air, for it is forced straight down into the water."
Alexander the Great may or may have not explored the Mediterranean with a diving bell as later figures such as Roger Bacon suggested but evidence shows that the ancient Hellenistic cultures certainly understood the nature of diving bells and documented them.

The above image is a 16th century Islamic painting of Alexander the Great exploring the Mediterranean in an early form of diving bell.

Diving bells are an apparatus used to allow divers to reach great depths maintaining a supply of oxygen inside the bell. Although not widely used or documented until the 16th century, Aristotle is credited with the first description of a diving bell in the 4th century BC.

"…they enable the divers to respire equally well by letting down a cauldron, for this does not fill with water, but retains the air, for it is forced straight down into the water."

Alexander the Great may or may have not explored the Mediterranean with a diving bell as later figures such as Roger Bacon suggested but evidence shows that the ancient Hellenistic cultures certainly understood the nature of diving bells and documented them.

7PM
The Antikythera mechanism is an early form of analogue computer used for astronomy. It was discovered in the early 20th century and is considered extremely advanced. Dating has placed the mechanism around the 1st century BC and similar levels of technology were not seen again until the 14th century.
Researchers are unsure of the mechanism’s origins and speculate that it may be from a Corinthian colony such as Syracuse or was perhaps from a city further east such as Pergamon in modern day Anatolia.
The mechanism was discovered on a shipwreck and a great deal of mystery surrounds it and it’s origins. One theory is that it was lost when being transported to Rome for the triumph of Julius Caesar. Whatever the case may be, it is an intriguing artefact and a great example of Hellenistic technology and engineering.
More can be read here

The Antikythera mechanism is an early form of analogue computer used for astronomy. It was discovered in the early 20th century and is considered extremely advanced. Dating has placed the mechanism around the 1st century BC and similar levels of technology were not seen again until the 14th century.

Researchers are unsure of the mechanism’s origins and speculate that it may be from a Corinthian colony such as Syracuse or was perhaps from a city further east such as Pergamon in modern day Anatolia.

The mechanism was discovered on a shipwreck and a great deal of mystery surrounds it and it’s origins. One theory is that it was lost when being transported to Rome for the triumph of Julius Caesar. Whatever the case may be, it is an intriguing artefact and a great example of Hellenistic technology and engineering.

More can be read here

7PM

This weeks theme will be on science and technology!

December62013

New Content Coming Soon!

I’m going to start making themed weeks so each week will focus on something different. Maybe a certain city state, deity, or time period. Tags will be made to help organise content so all posts relating to Athens for example can be found in one place!

The first themed week will start on Monday.

A few ideas I’ve had have been:

  • The successor kingdoms of Egypt, Macedon and the Seleucid Empire
  • The Titans and their related mythology
  • Hellenic and Hellenistic inventions and science

Feel free to suggest anything you would like to see!

What would you like to see as the first theme?

December12013
ancientpeoples:

Necklace
330-300 BC
East Greek
(Source: The British Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Necklace

330-300 BC

East Greek

(Source: The British Museum)

September262013

italianartsociety:

Julius Caesar dedicated the Temple of Venus Genetrix in Rome on this day in 46 BCE. Caesar traced his ancestry to Aeneas, son of the Roman goddess of love and beauty. In dedicating the temple to Venus Genetrix, Caesar drew attention to her role as mother. Typical of Roman temples, the sanctuary was raised on a high podium and held a cult statue of Venus as well as portrait statues of Caesar himself. The original temple was destroyed by fire in 80 CE and was rebuilt by Emperor Domitian and restored by Trajan. Three columns survive from the second temple.

Temple of Venus Genetrix, rebuilt by Trajan 113 CE, Rome

Plan of Imperial Fora, Rome

Silver denarius of Julius Caesar, reverseAeneas carrying palladium and his father Anchises, 47-46 BCE. New York: The Metropolitan Museum of Art: Rogers Fund, 1908.170.80

(via elfoftheforest)

September232013
hadrian6:

Greek and Etruscan Vases. 18th.century.  Alexandre Isidore Leroy de Barde. French. 1777-1828. watercolor.
http://hadrian6.tumblr.com

hadrian6:

Greek and Etruscan Vases. 18th.century.  Alexandre Isidore Leroy de Barde. French. 1777-1828. watercolor.

http://hadrian6.tumblr.com

(via paganblood)

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